Grant applications

Brian Martin

All my applications to the Australian Research Council (and its forerunner, the Australian Research Grants Committee) are listed here. There are links to the applications available in electronic form.

Note that applications are submitted in about March of the year before the date indicated. For example, the application for 2003 funding was submitted in March 2002, with the decision announced in October 2002.

In a typical year, 20 to 25% of ARC applications are successful. In some years in the 1990s, about one fifth of applications were "culled" and not sent to assessors. They were deemed uncompetitive and not worth assessing. After being culled three successive times, in November 1997 I wrote "An ARC story", which received a bit of media attention. Coincidentally or not, my next application was sent to assessors and was successful.

For my analysis of grant systems, see my article "Research grants: problems and options".

2012, Nonviolent action and the violence connection
Unsuccessful. Ranked in the top 25% of unsuccessful proposals, roughly in the top 40% of all proposals.

2011, Theory for nonviolent social transformation
Unsuccessful. Ranked in the bottom 75% of unsuccessful proposals, roughly the bottom 58% of all proposals.

2010, Theory for nonviolent social transformation
Unsuccessful. Ranked in group D, between the top 50% and 75% of unsuccessful proposals (in other words, the bottom 19% to 39% of all applications).

2009, Tactics of deception
Unsuccessful. Ranked in group C, between the top 25% and top 50% of unsuccessful proposals.

2008, Tactics in complex conflicts
Unsuccessful

2007, Nonviolent action and complex warfare
Unsuccessful. The ranking of the application relative to other applications according to the four selection criteria was: significance and innovation, 38%; approach, 27%; national benefit, 75%; track record, 42%.

2006, Tactics of social transformation
Unsuccessful. The ranking of the application relative to other applications according to the four selection criteria was: significance and innovation, 65%; approach, 64%; national benefit, 42%; track record, 85%. Rated in the top 10% of unfunded projects. Awarded a "near miss" grant by the University of Wollongong.

2003, Theory and action for opposing political repression
Successful, funded at half the requested amount for 2003-2005

2002, The methods and dynamics of cyberactivism
Unsuccessful

2000, The failure of whistleblowing
Unsuccessful (culled: rejected without being sent to assessors)

1999, Communication technology for nonviolent struggle
Successful, funded at roughly the requested amount for 1999-2001

At this stage I wrote "An ARC story".

1998, Communication technology for nonviolent struggle
Unsuccessful (culled: rejected without being sent to assessors)

1997, Communication technology and nonviolent struggle
Unsuccessful (culled: rejected without being sent to assessors)

1996, Communication technology and nonviolent struggle
Unsuccessful (culled: rejected without being sent to assessors)

1993, Science and technology for nonviolent struggle
Successful, funded at roughly the requested amount for 1993-1995

1992, Science for nonviolent struggle
Unsuccessful

1991a, Scientific controversy and public decision-making (with Evelleen Richards and Pam Scott)
Unsuccessful

1991b, The social and policy impolications of road transport informatics (with Pam Scott)
Unsuccessful

1990, Scientific controversy and public decision-making (with Evelleen Richards and Pam Scott)
Unsuccessful

1989a, Vulnerability and resilience in Australian telecommunications
Unsuccessful

1989b, Scientific controversy and public decision-making (with Evelleen Richards)
Unsuccessful

1987, The vulnerability of some key Australian technological systems to military threats
Successful, funded for two years at $10,000 per year, one-third the requested amount for 1987-1988


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